Appalachian English explained

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scatman77
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Appalachian English explained

Unread post by scatman77 » Tue Nov 28, 2017 7:55 am

I came across this article which simply explains our Appalachian English and why we talk the way that we do. It also explains why it's Appa-LATCH-un and not that other blasphemous pronunciation. Enjoy...

http://appalachianmagazine.com/2017/11/ ... fferently/


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Re: Appalachian English explained

Unread post by appaneer1984 » Tue Nov 28, 2017 8:08 am

Very interesting article, great find!


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Re: Appalachian English explained

Unread post by DaphneUrquhart » Tue Nov 28, 2017 8:24 am

This is one of several articles I've seen on the subject. There was a book in my parents' house titled "The Queen's English" that detailed the connection between Southern and Elizabethan English. I'll keep my accent and my odd words with great glee.


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Re: Appalachian English explained

Unread post by mtnjax » Tue Nov 28, 2017 8:37 am

I wish I had this article to reference when I was in school and some the northern transplants I knew liked to point out my accent



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Re: Appalachian English explained

Unread post by WVAPPeer » Tue Nov 28, 2017 8:38 am

scatman77 wrote:
Tue Nov 28, 2017 7:55 am
I came across this article which simply explains our Appalachian English and why we talk the way that we do. It also explains why it's Appa-LATCH-un and not that other blasphemous pronunciation. Enjoy...

http://appalachianmagazine.com/2017/11/ ... fferently/
Thanks so much for posting this site - I have already read several of the articles and plan to read more - so much, so true for people of Appalachia and especially West BY GOD Virginia :D


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Re: Appalachian English explained

Unread post by ASU3432Mi » Tue Nov 28, 2017 9:16 am

Excellent article. I'm sending it to my brother in law in Richmond who continually mispronounces "Appalachian" even after being corrected numerous times. I think it may be intentional now. Very condescending.



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Re: Appalachian English explained

Unread post by moonshine » Tue Nov 28, 2017 1:05 pm

DG needs to have this article inserted into the game programs.


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Re: Appalachian English explained

Unread post by NoLongerLurking » Tue Nov 28, 2017 2:30 pm

ASU3432Mi wrote:
Tue Nov 28, 2017 9:16 am
Excellent article. I'm sending it to my brother in law in Richmond who continually mispronounces "Appalachian" even after being corrected numerous times. I think it may be intentional now. Very condescending.
Punch him in the throat.



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Re: Appalachian English explained

Unread post by Yosefus » Tue Nov 28, 2017 3:00 pm

Just yesterday I was in a cafe in Delaware for breakfast. Up here traveling on business. I started to order and the waitress started to grin. I asked her what was wrong? She asked me where are you from? I have never heard that accent before. I told her I was from the blue ridge mountains of North Carolina. She was nice about it and didn't try to poke fun at me. I told her I spoke Appalachian American not English!



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Re: Appalachian English explained

Unread post by WataugaMan » Tue Nov 28, 2017 3:33 pm

I was speaking to some of my Northern Relatives (wife's side, Ohio roots) this past weekend on the Appalachian dialect. I indicated that our dialect is one of (if not the most) purest forms of original Elizabethan language still in existence. It was just too much for my brother-in-law to handle in all of his "open mindedness."



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Re: Appalachian English explained

Unread post by ugmw177 » Thu Nov 30, 2017 3:43 pm

Interesting article; however, with the exception of the *'un example, all or most of the other wording and pronunciations are prevalent through the rural south. When I showed up in Boone, the only term I couldn't figure out was "you'uns" which I think was more of a Linville, Spruce Pine, Little Switzerland sort of contraction then actually Boone.

Also, the outer bankers [originals] are said to speak the closest to Elizabethan English accents in the Americas.



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Re: Appalachian English explained

Unread post by Longrifle28 » Thu Nov 30, 2017 4:24 pm

ugmw177 wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 3:43 pm
Interesting article; however, with the exception of the *'un example, all or most of the other wording and pronunciations are prevalent through the rural south. When I showed up in Boone, the only term I couldn't figure out was "you'uns" which I think was more of a Linville, Spruce Pine, Little Switzerland sort of contraction then actually Boone.

Also, the outer bankers [originals] are said to speak the closest to Elizabethan English accents in the Americas.
We always called them hoigh toiders....


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